Results tagged ‘ David Price ’

Could Price’s Success Turn into a Rays Windfall?

This is the time of year when every baseball fan within the Tampa Bay region is anxious. This is the moment when every single fan has the air of an expert, with plots, sidebars and commentary on the team’s direction, points of attack and their own pick list of potential new jersey names to be sewn upon the Rays Carolina Blue unis.

This is that unscripted and unabridged segment of the MLB merry-go-round adventure where even the most popular and productive of names can find themselves not only trade whispers, but packing for new horizons and opportunities. With a mire tick of the off-season clock anyone currently residing on the Rays roster or farm system can not be totally at ease or comfortable because when the bell tolls for the MLB GM Meetings, it is a loud and clear signal that the first round of touchie-feelie wheeling and dealing conversations will commence and someone Rays tenure can be vaporized with a single late night ringtone.

Even someone like Rays ace David Price who has just been announced as 1 of the 3 choices for the 2012 American League Cy Young award, but Price could just as quickly find his name penciled in on a deal worksheet or scribbled on a team’s “wish list”. This is not to say Price is going anywhere, but if the perfect deal with the right talent that could right the Rays sinking offensive ship were to materialize…. Rays Executive VP of Baseball Ops Andrew Friedman might ponder it……for a moment.

Most would think it insane to even talk about Price going anywhere with his successes piling up during the last 4-odd seasons, but sometimes a player, even someone with mega-talent and rising potential can make another team so hungry to hitch their wagon to a player’s rising star they overpay and bring a bevy of goodness to someone anxiously wanting offense like the Rays.

Another odd factoid to remember is that Price has a limited and quickly evaporating fiscal shelf life as a Ray with his second arbitration salary a “gues-timate of around $ 7.5 million for 2013 which would escalate Price into the thin stratosphere of salaries for a player in his second walk down the arbitration process. That would put Price in the second slot in regards to salary only beaten by his fellow co-Ace James Shields who will bank $10.25 million for throwing the rock.

Immediately it comes to your mind the Rays would be insane to even consider trading one of their most popular and productive mainstays, but the MLB is a business and if someone is willing to part with an astronomical package…no one, not even Price is safe from at least a sitdown discussion. And we know all to well that the rest of his MLB peers have mad respect for the Rays southpaw bestowing upon Price the 2012 Player’s Choice award as the American Leagues “Outstanding Pitcher”. And these pieces of hardware that Price is amassing yearly only bring the cruel reality into the sunlight that one day Price will unfortunately price himself out of the Rays fold.

Price is only hitting the second of his 4 trips through the arbitration process and could command a salary above Shield’s $10.25 contract as early as the Spring of 2014 if he keeps moving onward and upwards fulfilling his potential. It’s a pity because Price has a chance to evolve into one of the greats, but this will not be realized wearing the Rays sunburst across his chest. Price’s Rays clock is ticking louder and louder every off-season towards the alarm finally chiming it is time for change.

I’m not forecasting, predicting or even remotely pondering Price’s departure, but the stark and undeniable truth is soon Price even with all his community upside and personality will make a trade decision a fiscal necessity. Maybe I’m being a bit too prudent, too calculated that possibly the Rays could turn Price now while his value is through the Trop’s Teflon roof and gain a top infield prospect, a few near the MLB caliber players that could fortify this Rays roster for the next 5 years with more offense, or maybe even a proven Bullpen arm to join forces with Fernando Rodney and Joel Peralta to form a tight 1-2-3 late inning punch.

Some times hard decision have to be mentioned, breached and put out into the open air even if they may be considered unwarranted or mis-guided by their timing. Shields, Jeremy Hellickson, Jeff Niemann and even Wade Davis will have their names thrown out into the wind this Winter as trade pieces, trade considerations or even sent packing for financial or offensive relief.

Bringing up Price’s name here brings out the reality of the off-season that no one, not even Matt Moore who has a team friendly contract can be considered “off limits” or beyond trade rumors and whispers. Price is probably completely safe right now in the eyes of Friedman and the Rays front office. But you have to wonder, when a player is at their highest career point with them teetering on the cusp of maximum possible return on value, can you ignore the sanity of the situation.

I do not envy Friedman’s job because I would hate to be remembered as the guy who traded Price, even if it did make sense.   

Is Tatman the Missing Puzzle Piece?

Photo credit:  Fangraphs.com

On the surface most people might be scratching their noggins wonder what Tampa Bay Rays Executive VP of Baseball Operations Andrew Friedman was thinking trading for another infielder. Here the Rays go again gathering up loose vital pieces from other clubs like they have previously with the likes of Will Rhymes, Jeff Keppinger and Brook Conrad.

Friedman however did buck the usual hectic Trade Deadline pattern by offering up a peace offering of a 2B Double -A prospect (Tyler Bortnick) for the services of Roberts, who will be under team control until 2015. This is usually the time of years where teams dispense or send lengthy and costly options to other vistas. It is pretty rare a player who was recently designated for assignment to let another Arizona infield player have his 40-man roster spot gets traded.

But the Rays followed their defined and articulated mindset of getting a player with some “meat on their bones” for future considerations instead of renting a body hoping they can help the Rays offense flourish. Underneath the surface, down near ground level the truth begins to appear, and it seems Friedman again possibly stole a player who could be a Rays fixture for at least 3 more seasons.

Even closer to the sand granules you will see past Roberts current .250 average and peek under the sand pile to actually see that Roberts has been on a bit of a offensive tear recently. Roberts might have been used a bit sparingly, but has hit for an impressive .438 (7-for-16) average over the last 15 days with a couple RBI and stolen bases to his credit.

Going to be interesting as Roberts makes his way to Baltimore to meet up with his new team. Might be even more interesting to see what transpires with Roberts Twitter account (@RRoberts14 ) now that he is a Ray and SP David Price has cemented his name with uniform # 14….I hear jersey # 41 has a vacancy. 

Recently we have heard the howls and hoots that Evan Longoria could soon be finally going on another rehab run, hopefully this time with no setbacks or stalls. But if anything would happen, or even with the possibility that Longoria with Luke Scott still out with back situations, and Hidecki Matsui gone into the brilliant sunset, Longo possibly could come back a bit sooner than later and man the DH slot for a bit while he gets into game shape and gets his defensive rhythm on track.

That is where possibly the addition of Roberts could bring about a few bonus points, possibly giving the Rays and Longo a DH option so the team can get his bat back into the line-up. Could Roberts be the long awaited puzzle piece that finally gets the Rays offense and defense running in unison and firing on all their cylinders? If his 2011 stats can come to life again in Tampa Bay, and his hard nosed style of play continues…..Tatman may be here for a long, long time as a Ray. 

A Personal Way to Get That Sought After Autograph

What if I could give you an alternative to obtaining that cherished signature of your favorite sports figure without having to feel like a sardine in the can awaiting his arrival down by the field railing? What if I can get you virtually and digitally “hooked up” with a unique way to not only get that autograph, but be provided the additional added bonus of getting your selected photo personalized with the cherry on top of it all being a 30 second sound byte by that player?

 etter yet, what if I told you it is not only pleasantly affordable, but it can also be conveniently emailed with no tussle of fuss of having black Sharpie stains on your fingers or hand, plus the stress-free addition of not having to fight your way in or out of the assembled crowd seeking that same player’s autograph. Now Egraphs can not only make that experience pleasant, it can give you the opportunity to get a photo personalized without worry of offending the player or those seeking his autograph without the hassle of wasting your precious time and possibly being one of those missed by the player before he leaves.

This revolutionary idea in obtaining and personalizing autographs was the brain child of the Auld brothers David and Brian who also happens to be the Tampa Bay Rays Senior Vice President for Business Operations. Brian might be the “idea guy”, but it is David who once worked for technologically savvy Microsoft out in Seattle brought this concept together after hatching the idea last Summer. Also on board with the Auld brothers is former Rays player Gabe Kapler who will take on the role of Director of Business Development, and with his MLB connections should have a stream of players and MLB personnel both active and from the past phoning him for a chance at providing their own images and signatures to this expanding Egraphs universe.

Think about this for a second, you could be a huge Rays fan who live outside the 727 or 813 zip codes living anywhere, anyplace in this country or overseas and by just going through a simple application you could receive a photo personalized along with a short voice message from your favorite player. This concept can not only broadens the player and teams fan base outside the confines of Tampa Bay, it brings about the possibility of these special autographs and photos being presented as special tokens of loyal fans through the Rays Republic on a worldwide basis. Even at the recently completed All Star Game festivities in Kansas City, Missouri there was chatter and whispers about this great product, and I would not be surprised if the Egraphs roster of players doesn’t explode over the second half of this season and be a formidable personalized autograph provider by Spring Training 2013.

Interesting enough, one of the first investors in this project was Rays principal owner Stuart Sternberg who knows a thing or two about investments and risks. And if you peel back the surface of this presently baseball-related autograph and photo opportunity, there is an unlimited and expansive opening of the arms to possibly include other sports from NFL, NBA or NHL as well as Hollywood stars and people in the news to become future providers of their images and signatures. And the process is really simple, heck I tried out the process today just to see how it all plays out, and it was effortless for me until I had to decide what I wanted message I might want personalized to myself or someone else.

Maybe you write a blog and might want to use it as an avatar, maybe include it as a link on your website, or maybe you want a framed 8X11 of the photo for your office or personal baseball shrine? It is all as simple as writing an email and for an offering of $50 which includes a high resolution photo which is electronically signed and personalized by the player, then emailed to your email address. This whole painless autograph process is not only affordable, it is a down right steal. 

Think of how invaluable this is not only for the fans, but for the players as they can use an I-pad device anywhere, even on the charter flight, in the clubhouse, or maybe even lounging on a Florida beach during an off-day or off-season. By simply using a stylist and voice recorder, the player can complete the request in their leisure taking away the added stress of a crowd of people with Sharpies, balls or photos waved in front of them for their signatures. I truly think this whole new way of getting autographs could bring about a serenity to the whole process and will be a great asset for both parties involved.

 Egraphs currently have around 100 players in their stable, but as other learn of the ease of this new autograph endeavor, the Egraphs list will expand as rapidly as Kapler and his (future) staff can answer the phone. Of course some people are afraid the signatures might not be original, and possibly be duplicated in some way. Well, Egraphs has devised a system where not only can the clubhouse assistant or friend of the player not sign the photographs, there is a voice recognition system to not only helps authenticate the process, but give you the satisfaction of knowing you got the autograph you desired along with a real voice message.

 Of course for an additional fee of $45, you can also get a certificate of authenticity provided with your 8X10 framed photograph that will not only be good for future generations, but gives you piece of mind and security that this is indeed an real photo and signature of your favorite player. So if you want to check out Egraphs, you can click on any of the “Egraphs” mentions in this posting, or go to this link and check it out for yourself. This new way of getting autographs is not meant to replace or remove the thrill or adventure of getting it in person, it just gives others the opportunity to also get that exciting feeling of having a genuine MLB player’s photo and signature, with a personalized both written and vocal message just for them.

That to me is simply priceless.  

30 Minutes to Reflect, then Onto the Second Half

By the time I end up posting this on Sunday, the Tampa Bay Rays will either be celebrating their gutsy performance over the first half, or spending 30 minutes before thoughts turn to the second half, and the chase for another spot on the post season dance card. Expectation were sky-high in April, reality and gravity brought the surreal excitement to a halt with unforeseen injuries and players beginning a Conga line into and out of Rays Head Trainer Ron Porterfield’s humble office. Even with a victory today in Cleveland, this 2012 Rays squad will have posted the worst record of any Rays team since their re-incarnation in November 2007 by dropping the “Devil”.

From the hamstring drama of Evan Longoria, the fainting spell that possessed Will Rhymes, to the bats that turned to sawdust, the first half of 2012 has been a test of patience, determination and faith both in the dugout and among the stands. True fans have seen this before, but it was pre-2008 when the Rays Republic had to hold their breath as long, and pray to anything and anyone for a simple single victory during some of their awful losing bouts so far this season. Do not fret little Rays campers, for the 2012 edition of Rays complete with their patchwork quilt of fielders and hodge podge of Mendoza Line hitters might not be the defensive unit of 2011, but they have the courage, confidence and vital constitution that was forged in 2008 and is still rock hard today.

That might be the Rays saving grace with their line-up changing as much as the flight board in Chicago O’Hare Airport with rehab delays, hitting slumps for the ages and a defense that looks more like a piece of Swiss Cheese. Even with all these intangibles working against them, the Rays will end the day with an identical 44-41 record as the Cleveland Indians. But hidden just out of view is the travel this team has taken lately that took them from the 4th slot in the American League East standings, to possibly the second spot by nightfall. Even with all the toils and troubles on the field, this team still is in prime choice position heading into their home-stand on Friday to make an early run at solidifying their silver medal position.

When Longoria went down, this team did not fret, did not pout. Instead they called upon new additions to the Rays fight card from Brandon Allen, Drew Sutton, Rick Thompson and finally Brooks Conrad trying to piece together a consistent order both on the field and in the batters’ box. Some pieces of this amended puzzle proved moot, and have been cut away from this team either for good, or onto the Triple-A Durham Bulls roster. Farmhands Stephen Vogt and Chris Gimenez tried to show down home production, but both faltered and again found themselves again staring at the Green Monster in Durham wondering “what if”.

Hitting has been the throne in the Rays side for most of this season as the team will enter today’s contest with a Team Batting Average of .232, which is the lowest average at this point in a season , but then again the 2011 squad entered the All Star break with a .245 average last season and went onto a post season Wild Card bid. And their last 13 games has been especially cruel to the Rays as they have been held to 4 runs or less in 11 of those games, and have hit only .193 with RISP. But hope is shining on the Rays lately as Luke Scott shrugged off his hitting slump demon with two powerful blasts in C-town, and has looked more relaxed and selective in his appearances.

That is a good thing as the Rays Designated Hitter position has looked more like the 9th slot in an National League line-up than an AL powerhouse slot. Scott and Hideki Matsui have not been able to capitalize and make opponents pitchers pay for their mistakes, which is vital for this position. Sure the Rays have been Hit by a Pitch more than anyone else in the AL (36 times), but going into today contest, the Rays are tied with Baltimore for the most K’s (679) in the American League. Possibly with Scott again finding a groove he likes, the Rays DH spot again can bring some amount of fear and power heading into the final months of the season.

Defense has been so bad early on for the Rays they currently have 71 errors with a few innings to play in today’s contest. To put this into perspective, the Rays have had 19 multi error games including today’s game and seen 22 flaws coming out of Longo-land (3B), 14 out of the 6-slot, and 11 from the pivot (2B). For this team to again climb back into the Wild Card race and have any shot of catching division leading New York Yankees, this team has to hone their throwing and again look like a impervious defensive stalwart. This is not to say this team has to be flawless, but they need to be calculated mistakes that can be erased possibly with double plays or sneaky pick-off moves, not be free run scoring opportunities for their opposition.

One part of the Rays equation though has been up to the challenge and has consistently shown they have the field players backs, even if the bats did not respond in kind. The Rays Team ERA of 3.72 (3rd best mark in club history at the break) combined with a club record 676 strikeout heading into the All Star break has been the foundation for many of the Rays 1st half victories. David Price shared the best record in the AL (11-4) and combined with Rays greybeard James Shields, they have sent 214 hitters back to the dugout via the K so far this season. Matt Moore has found his rhythm again, Hellboy is ready to wreck havoc and Cobb is primed to prove he belongs here even after SP Jeff Niemann heals.

We saw another piece of the Rays pitching future come into the spotlight and perform as Rays prospect Chris Archer became the first non-Rays raised farmhand to take the hill as a starter in the long, long time. Archer showed just how valuable he will be for this team in the coming seasons, and Alex Cobb only cemented his reputation not only at this level, but as a solid MLB pitcher.

Expectation were high in April, but even with this fall from grace the last few months, the Rays are in prime real estate to again fight to the last game for another chance to play into October. Even with all the Rays perils, they are only a few well placed wins away from the top Wild Card slot, and with the momentum of their recent win in their old nemesis Cleveland, the Rays should be pumped to against strap on the uniforms this Friday when rival Boston invade the Trop.

I’m going to take a page from Rays Manager Joe Maddon mantra book and forget this first half in 30 minutes as soon as the Rays exit the turf at Progressive field and become excited and enamored with the second half and all its possibilities. This Rays team is one that is built for the long haul. With Longoria set to possibly still be out to mid to late August, and Matt Joyce possibly missing the 10-game home stand to start the second half, again faith, a slice of good luck and possibly a few bats finding the ball could help this team until their offensive brethren again don the Rays sunburst.

30 minutes has since elapsed since my first written word, time to forget the first half and stand ready, willing and able to help this team push a few squads out of their way in the second half of the season….or die trying.

 

Tonight I Anticipate Something Special

I don’t care what you are doing tonight, cancel it and get down to Tropical Field. On tap tonight should be a classic pitcher’s match-up between two completely different style of starters who could put on a nice pitching clinic tonight that could be the eventual precursor to either of them getting a possible shot to hit the dirt first at this season’s All Star Game in Kansas City.

If a total of 17 combined wins between New York Mets hurler R A Dickey and Tampa Bay Rays southpaw starter David Price can not get you excited about this contest, you had better go have your pulse checked, because you might be dead. On tap tonight could be the premier InterLeague pitching match-up of not only this week, but the entire InterLeague sliver of the 2012 season, and it all will be played out under the tilted cap in St. Petersburg.

If that is not enough to make you pile into the jalopy and putter on down to 1 Tropicana Drive, in town for this limited engagement is a team that used to hold their annual Spring Training locally here in the ‘Burg, and is making their first trek into their old Spring home turf in 11 years. Member when the Mets used to come here every Spring from 1962 to1987 holding court over in the fields near the Jungle Prada section of the city.


I mean personally, I’m totally curious to see what a “hard knuckleball” looks like coming in at possibly 80 mph in comparison to the butterfly slow velocity knuckler thrown by former Red Sox pitcher Tim Wakefield. I am truly eager to see not only how Dickey can adjust and pitch against this struggling Rays offense, but will keep a keen eye on the Mets catcher to see just how you can keep that fluttering white sphere in your glove. Looking at the opposite side of the spectrum, it should be another chance for Price to again show some of his tricks of the trade via a blazing fastball combined with a newly refined curve and change-up to keep the Mets bats honest.

Surely this contest is billed as a “pitcher’s duel” with the unique possibility of a 1-0 or 2-1 score deciding this contest. But do not forget, these two hurlers have also posted 148 K’s and each sports an impressive ERAs between 2.40 (Price) and 2.44 (Dickey) this season. They also both have held opposing batters to stellar opposition batting average that are just a tick South of .236 mark and both have 1 shutout and complete game to their credit this season.

Heck, the only blip on either pitcher’s radar to show any weakness might be the fact Price only went 5 innings in his last start against the Yankees in New York. You would have to dig all the way back to Price’s start on April 13th in Boston to find any sub 5 inning start by the consistent southpaws this season. Dickey also suffered his only sub 5 inning stint about the same time this season when he only lasted 4.2 innings on April 18th in a contest in Atlanta against the Braves. Both have been consistent in going into the late innings of games, with powerful pitches at their disposal.


Tonight it is a mano-on-mano match-up. Classic hard-nose power pitching against the crafty and frustrating ball that can come in hard, or flutter like a firefly under the dome’s lights. If you like the Chess match that can turn into a baseball game, this is the game for you. So, why aren’t you here already? This game has all the earmarks of possibly turning into an instant classic 2012 baseball moment.

I’ll save you a seat. 

Could the Trop. Pull Off a “Dog Day”?

Earlier this season when I sat down with a departing member of the Rays front office and he let out a juicy morsel that the Rays might be considering a future brand of Rays “Bark at the Park”. For those who have not witnessed or had the fun of this type of event, fans can bring their canine “other-halfs” to the ballpark with them for that days contests and enjoy the sights and sounds along with a few hotdogs with their owners. Teams all around Major League Baseball already hold these sorts of annual canine appreciation days, but here in Tampa Bay, we have seen zero.

Now this is not an official Rays event yet, or even mentioned “officially” by the club, but over the weekend the Miami Marlins had just such an event at their indoor stadium, and by the way the stadium smelled by the end of the 9th inning, the stadium sanitation crew was on the ball scooping the tidbits left by canine Marlins fans.

The reason I bring this up tonight is the success of the Marlins canine event could and should get the wheels turning for a possible future Rays version. We now know that an indoor facility like Tropicana Field could host such an event, and possibly be one of the great moments of an MLB season. I actually was on hand for a “Dog Day Afternoon” event several years ago in Chicago and thought of what a great event this would be for my hometown Rays to hold for their faithful 4-legged fans who only get to see the game on television.

Possibly since our sister MLB franchise has now held a dog day afternoon event in their new home, members of the Rays stadium staff and promotions team could pay a post-event visit to the Miami club and see the way they produced and made this event such a success, even with the roof closed. I would be amazed to see such an event held within the tilted roof of the Trop., complete with the annual Frisbee-catching canines, maybe a booth set up by local animal shelters, and a secondary outlet so fans could buy those adorable calendars that host Rays players and their canine “best friends”.

I mean if the Rays and the local no-kill animal shelter Pet Pal Animal Shelter could come to some promotional agreement, maybe the event could also include a paw-print signing area of the Rays pooches, or pre-game stroll by master and pal along the First or Third baseline. I mean think of the great exposure for the calendar, the Rays would get National exposure for the kinder, gentler side off the competitive Turf, plus would be a great win-win for the Fans, players and this region.

Sure you would have to possibly buy a seat ticket for your dog, but maybe the Rays can also combine it with a Rays brand Dog Bandanna, or maybe even a Jango (Longo’s dog) or Astro (Price’s pal) image upon the item to bring it all together. I know all of this might never materialize or even be on the Rays drawing board, but it should. I know of plenty of Rays fans who have remarked over the years wondering why the team doesn’t do these special canine days like other stadiums.

 Odd thought here, maybe the Rays could find a pet food purveyor who could give away samples or even sponsor the giveaway with their branding somewhere on the new Rays bandanna. Of course all of this might just be in my mind right now, with the Rays not even having such an event on their drawing boards until possibly the 2013 season. Still, for someone like me who does his share of people-watching as well as watching this club play baseball, it would make one more authentic and totally wacky reason to hit the ball park. In other words, Rays, let’s make this happen.  

Sometimes Commenting Has its Own Price

The funny thing about baseball is, we all think we have answers, have professional knowledge from watching hundreds of games either live or on television. We gain our expertise per se from announcers, visual observations while most of us have never played above the Little League level. It is almost as if baseball has issued to the fans its own version of freedom of speech, but with the advent of social media now, can it go too far?

In the stands sometimes the collective fans themselves can take action, embarrassing the foolish rants or possibly make sure the “offender” takes a chill pill and remembers a game is in progress and he can be removed if enough fans voice their own raves. It doesn’t happen often that a fan either for the home or visiting team goes beyond that baseline of respect or coarse language, but when they do, most players just let it wash off them like gentle raindrops. Every once in a while you hear someone say something to a play you know hit deeps, crosses that imaginary line and you wish he had done anything to spank the oppressive fool.

Well, recently one Major League player decided someone had gone a bit too far. No, he did not go into the stands like a hockey enforcer or launch a 94 mph rocket to the kisser of the offending ruffian, instead he just cut and pasted the obscure comments and let the word know what he sometimes has to deal with outside of our usual Twitter visual sight-lines.

@DAVIDprice14 for all the tweeters 1. I have season tix 2 I like price but inconsistent in big games

  1. price has no closeout pitch”

 Sure the comment might have lacked a bit of killer intentions, but sometimes something written gnarls at you and you feel compelled to at least comment or write a rebuttal. Price definitely took the high road and just cut and pasted the comments so we all can see and know the type of absurd and unintelligent rhetoric nonsense these guys get after fighting the good fight during a game, an inning or even a career.

I left off this guys Twitter handle from the posted comment to not advertise his ramblings any further because his baseball and pitching logic definitely ranks below the bottom of the barrel. But there is one comment he made first that got my attention and definitely shows spending a lot of time watching games at Tropicana Field doesn’t make you a baseball guru or Coach.

I am glad this guy has Rays Season Tickets and supports his hometown team, but in that same vein, if he has truly attended multiple seasons of games, he must have slept through many of Price’s great moments on the hill, especially in 2008. Sure I went to the past well there for a reason. The guy stated Price “ had no closeout pitch”. Well, hate to tell you, amassing a 5-2 record in 2012 and a 12-13 last season, Price has got to have a “closeout” something to get those “W’s”.
 Of course this rant came after Price and the Rays lost a game to the rival New York Yankees and former A L Cy Young winner Sabathia. I understand the frustration of seeing this team lose after posting an impressive recent home stand, but at least know the facts before boasting your “expertise”. Lost somewhere in his multiple baseball brainiac cells is the true stat that this loss by Price to his fellow southpaw Sabathia was his first “L” against this opposing hurler in his career.

Could this commenter have some merit since Price did give up a historic Home Run to Yankee Derek Jeter for his 3,000th career hit in 2011? But doesn’t every pitcher want to be on the hill when a historic moment is approaching for a rival and want to either strike them out, prevent them from reaching that plateau or unfortunately being cast into the annuals of history by missing their mark.

Still, Price has battled 5 prior Cy Young winners in 8 starts during his career before his May 10th loss to Sabathia and had a 5-0 record with a stellar 1.69 ERA. Did one bad start and sub sequential Home Run barrage by Yankee Curtis Granderson make Price a second tier pitcher? I think not.

By the way, a winner wants the ball in his hand during big games, so if this commenter is dipping back into the past as far as 2010 when Price fell twice in opposing duels with ex-Texas Ranger southpaw Cliff Lee, that is digging for dirt in the wrong playground. Price, just like fellow Rays starter James Shields eagerly wants this tough games and moments that either elevate or humbles you. Sure it can boast huge amounts of frustration and wreck confidence, but Price is a man, and has handled himself as one, even with this comment missile to his integrity.

I do not condone someone ranting without purpose or reason, especially when it comes to sports or our hallowed athletes. Have merit and solid facts to back up the claims and I might agree, or agree to disagree on the subject. Either way, attacking or even suggesting something moronic like your second two points in your comment are ridiculous and warrants this wake-up call. I have yelled and posted a few things in my time that I regret, wish I had thought out and either deleted or apologized for.


I do not expect this commenter to do either of those things. He feels he is in the right. Had his ducks perfectly in a row and is firm in his convictions, even tho his logic has more holes than a wheel of Swiss cheese. But in the end Price took the right measure, let the fellow Rays fan baste and boil this fan a bit, and Price just sat back and watched the magic happen. Just goes to show you, sometimes these guys see and hear your absurd comments and rants, and one took it upon himself to hoist you to the wolves. Good for him.

Price Got his Inner “Avenger On” Against his Nemesis

We all know the movie “The Avengers” is about to hit our television sets in commercials, product placements and even trading cards. But did you know you saw a secondary super hero who somehow missed “The Avengers” casting call, but is just as important and heroic to the Tampa Bay community.

Tampa Bay Rays starter David Price who like the Hulk and Ironman has been forever been imprinted in our minds and souls with his 2011 Rays miniature super hero figurine fame with his dog Astro, showed us all his own “fight the good fight” moment last night television screens in a Nationally televised ESPN Sunday Night Baseball contest against his own archenemy, The Texas Rangers. Sure it was not the classic “Good versus Evil”, but it was a moment of redemption not only for Price, but for the Rays.

For this was the Lone Star nemesis who had assassinated the Rays Fall plans in both 2010 and 2011 by sweeping the Rays away from the post-season like a dust bunny en-route to their own American League titles. In that span, Price had never had a dominating moment against the red, white and blue hued Rangers, but last night he broke free, showed courage, determination and a nice stealthy selection of pitches to finally break through and thrust his hand skyward in victory.

Sure this might not make a 90 minute feature film, but I am truly glad Price got to show a National audience his performance as he finally got the better end against his arch-nemesis. Heading into this twilight contest, Price had taken the hill 10 times ( including 3 post season starts) against this Rangers foe and had come out empty with a 0-3 mark and an uncharacteristic 5.67 ERA during the regular season. Further complicating the matter for Price was the fact he was 0-1 with a 15.63 ERA in his previous 3 starts in Arlington.

 To say last night rose up against his fears and demons would seem, well cinematic, but absolutely true. I mean it had all the makings of a classic hero versus villain make-up as this Rangers squad was one of only 2 Major League baseball franchises in the American League Price had never scored a win against in his career (Seattle is the other, but Price has never started against them). Price definitely had his back to the wall as the Rays hoped to bring home a 2-1 advantage and series win with a victory, plus help Price demolish another obstacle in his pitching path.

Coming into this contest, 2/3rd of the Ranger line-up (6 hitters) had career batting averages of over .250 against Price. To show the precision and complete domination of Price over even these 6 arch-enemies, they went a combined 2-for-19 last night against Price with only Nelson Cruz, who entered the game as Price’s kyptonite sporting a career .574 average getting the 2 hits among the gang of 6.

Total Price dominance would be an understatement, but Price finally finding his groove against his ex-foe and taking them down in this style was simply a made for TV moment. Can’t wait for the second installment of this season’s series, possibly when the Rays return to Texas for another 3-game weekday series August 27-29. Who knows, maybe Price has figured out his nemesis, guess we have to stay tuned and wait until the end of August for this unfolding plot line to be revealed.

Rays Need to Wipe the Tarnish Off Their “Golden Arms”

Coming into the 2012 Major League Baseball season I do not think there was anyone connected with the game who had any major concerns about the Tampa Bay Rays starting pitching or their overhauled Bullpen. Most proclaimed them to be a pitching staff that was a year older, but considerably wiser beyond their years. From the only over 30 member of the starting rotation James Shields to rookie Matt Moore, the Rays were definitely a young staff to be wary of this season.

But how reality can change. How quickly things can go sideways, produce holes and show the Rays have a few situations, and not all of them have immediate solutions. Things looked up quickly for the Rays “Golden Arms” after sweeping the 2011 American League East champs, the New York Yankees at home. Quickly people were singing the praises of this young bunch of hurlers who seemed to have the midas touch, the “Golden Arms” moniker seem appropriate. Even after a hiccup of only winning one of three against the favored Detroit Tigers, the Rays seemed destine to head into the land of the Lobster and chowder with confidence and a chance.

Suddenly over a 3-game spread the Rays starters looked vulnerable, giving up extra base smashes that usually find a glove, or produce outs. Even though pitches were being placed perfectly in their quadrants, bats met ball almost like they knew it was going to be delivered there, without much sweat or guessing. Instantly eyes and fingers began to watch these Red Sox for clues or suggestions of a more clandestine reasoning for the Rays sudden fall from pitching grace. In an instant the once mystical Rays seemed bewildered and confused as speculation ran rampant that their secret formula had been deciphered and pilfered producing 3 straight dizzying losses to their divisional rival Boston.

The Rays seemed plagued by an aspiration more towards mediocrity than their acclaimed meteoric prediction. In a flash the Rays tumbled from the grace of promise to fall 0-3 and closer to the .500 mark before their ace, James Shields delivered them from the folly of losing all 4 contests to these Bostonians. Some say the difference was a change of habit, a visual game of hide and go seek where Rays catcher Jose Molina would do his best impression of hiding the corner and seeking the calls on the outside corners. Even if the strike zone did gain a few inches, it went both ways, but it did give Shields and the Rays a fighting chance.

You want to dissect the Rays starting staff and look for a fundamental reasoning for the Boston meltdown, but you will not find it. Tongues wagged that Moore was tipping off his pitches, but the same game outcome and hit barrage beset veteran hurler David Price and 2011 Rookie of the Year Jeremy Hellickson. How could a staff that stifled the Yankees less than a week before suddenly fall flat against a divisional rival they had winning history against in their ballpark. It is not like the Rays came into Boston complacent or sporting a superior record, somewhere the dike developed a leak and not until Shields hit the hill did it get plugged with success.

Some might contribute this strange quandary to the fact of a plethora of afternoon contests on this road trip, but that is the easy answer. The hard answer is this young staff is still maturing at times and can be vulnerable. The real answer is Hellickson and Moore have the abilities to shut down any American League offense, but if their control ticks even an inch off the plate, the Home Plate Umpire might not give that extra inch. That comes with experience and knowing which Umpire might be open to balls skipping the corners and who runs a tight strike zone. Worst thing is on any given night that variable could change without warning or hint.

We all know already if Shields and Price have the motors revving and are on point, only they can cost themselves a victory. Worst thing that could happen to the Rays is one of these two going down, or experiencing even a short span of wildness or ability to sit guys down via the outside corner called third strike. There is a gap between the experience levels of these two and the duo of Hellboy and M&M. Not even sure the tallest member of the silent assassins, Jeff Niemann can put himself into that middle ground at times. Even though the 6’9” Niemann can show the skills of an ace during his streaks, when he is off his game, weird things happen. You might consider Niemann a liability compared to the other 4 starters on this team, but when he is in his groove and popping balls into the strike zone, he looks more like a #3 starter than the back end option at #5.

The Rays starters just have to wipe the tarnish off their “Golden Arms” and again show the wealth and worth of their abilities to get the Rays close games that their offense can overcome and post wins. The Boston series was a debacle by any sense of the word, but this Toronto series might be the true test for the Rays starters. If they can harness themselves and post a winning edge in this first series in Canada, it could be a great launching pad into their home stand and again having people feel “golden” about this starting staff.

Did the Red Sox Signal Corps Find Success?

They’re just really hot right now,” Tampa Bay Rays Manager Joe Maddon told the Tampa Bay Times after Thursday afternoon’s 3rd loss in a row to the Boston Red Sox. “It’s almost like they knew what’s coming almost. They’re on every pitch. They’re on the fastball. They’re on the breaking ball. They’re on the change-up. They’re on everything right now. They’re really locked in.

Doesn’t take a baseball genius to decipher a little bit of hidden meaning in Maddon’s comments. But maybe Maddon is on to something. Sure stealing signs has been around since the invention of the game and unless you use a video tape system or other technology that can give you in-game information, Major League Baseball will turn it’s eye away from the situation. If you have every notice during Rays game, one of the Rays starters, and usually Rays Bullpen Catcher Scott Cursi will both keep an accurate account of the game stats, type of pitches and their results for future analysis.

This can be used in the future for predictions, but is not plausible for in-game use. Some thought the Rays pitching staff might be showing “tells” or tipping off their pitches during the Boston series. Seems a bit far-fetched when you consider the Rays sent hurlers David Price, Jeremy Hellickson and rookie Matt Moore to the hill in the first 3 contests, and they did not seem to exhibit any visual “tells” in the delivery, arm slot release or facial movements. There are 3 valid reasons the Red Sox might have gotten the upper hand on the Rays this series.

First off, Red Sox Manager Bobby Valentine is an astute student of the game who also caught for many years and knows the art of trying to both conceals and transmit false signals to prevent the stealing of signs. A smart Manager would have someone down near the back-end of the dugout watching in at the catcher, possibly seeing similarities, constant familiar movements or even a flash of a painted nail to signal the true intended pitch.

Just as quickly that player could tip his cap, stand up, clap his hands or do any number of audio or visual patterns to signify a certain pitch being thrown to the plate. This is not an illegal activity, but does seem to hide within the large gray area of the unwritten rules of baseball.

A great second indicator that the Boston brood might be fishing for signals is the fact the Red Sox brought in former Rays catcher Kelly Shoppach to be their primary backstop this season. Do not forget, it was this same Red Sox organization that gave @ShopHouse10 his first decent chance and taste of MLB life as a Red Sox prospect. Got to think the Red Sox have grilled and formulated a game plan in advance with information on pitching patterns and possible signal combinations so to get a bit of an edge against this young and talented staff.

This is also not illegal, and is a rather commonplace occurrence after a player leaves one team and joins another. But a catcher knows all the nuances and particulars of a team’s signal calling process. Even if the Rays changed their system this Spring, there is still leftover signals, patterns and small tell-tale signs that could trigger an all out discovery or disclosure of a team’s battery signals.

Still, Boston could have done their business the hard way and just watched game film from this Spring as these 2 squads played each other 3 times with the Red Sox coming away with wins in all 3 contests. Valentine could have had his off-the field staff tear down game tapes looking for patterns, “tells” or even a system that developed out of the constant movements of the Rays catchers this Spring and possibly into late 2011. He could have done it by dissecting the Rays Spring patterns, taking a slice of Shoppach’s past knowledge and sprinkled in a bit of his long history both as a spectator and catcher in the MLB.

Or maybe it is just as simple as Valentine figured out the Rays common “indicator” signal that all 3 of the Rays catchers from Jose Molina, Jose Lobaton to Chris Gimenez might have used when a player was on base. The “indicator” is usually one or two patterned finger or body movements made to try to throw off someone stealing signals, but if discovered, or if the pattern is somehow revealed throughout a contest, it can be a green light to the First and Third Base Coaches to alert hitters to what might be coming.

Even a calculated and synchronized system of random catcher movements and finger motions can be dissected within the scope of the game, possibly making the catcher the one giving up a “tell”. Even though it is illegal to videotape the concentrated area of the catcher for possible signal interception, the Centerfield camera always gives a perfect view into the heart of the plate, and signals can be deciphered quickly.

In the end it is a part of the game until you have hard concrete proof to the contrary. Considering Valentine and Shoppach could have brainstormed before the series began and when the indicators might have been discovered, the rest came fast and furious. But you want to think it was just an offense coming alive and no ulterior actions that hindered the Rays pitching staff this series.

But a clear indicator that possibly the system was compromised came to light today as starter James Shields held the Red Sox to a 4-hit shutout to break not only the Rays losing streak, but possibly the tale of the stealing signs. No matter if the Rays got duped by Boston this series and they did figure out the patterns and signals, it just goes to show you that not all information can be tied to a computer, a spreadsheet or even a video. Sometimes the human eye can figure out the game just as quickly and turn it into an advantage. I hope no signs were stolen, but who would fess up if it was true?

 

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